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At the present time we are completely and totally stocked with clips that have already been, in some form or another, posted. What this means precisely is that we are out of clips for the posting at the moment. I am in the process of scrambling to find another camera with which to film. Keep your RSS feeds running and hopefully in the next period of undetermined time there will be some more clips This should have been posted Sunday, but I was busy with something not entirely but almost completely unrelated to this site, namely helping my wife prepare for her trip to Korea. Hopefully things will be back up and running in jig time. I’ll post as soon as I have anything and if I happen to find anything interesting out there related to high-speed cameras I’ll happily post it. Now would be an excellent time to reminisce by perusing the hundred or so other clips that have already been posted. There really are a few neat ones there, ones that might even bear watching more than once, most especially if you happen to be new to the site and haven’t seen them yet.

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2 Comments

Comment by Paquito
2007-07-16 06:17:01

Hi,

Just “WOW”… The images are amazing…

Found this blog when searching some cornstarch images…

Just amazing… I’ll write a post about this blog on my post (hope you don’t mind) to recommend a visit here (it’s simply amazing :-) ).

Kind regards from Spain and please, keep on blogging new material!!!! :-)

Paquito

 
Comment by Tim McCormack
2007-07-23 14:36:54

(Sorry if I’ve reposted this, I couldn’t tell if the comment “took”, or is being held for moderation.)

I suppose you can still play around with new objects and events to film while you’re out of a camera. I’d suggest looking into dry ice and 2-liter bottles.

Dry ice is sold at some grocery stores, probably for freezing meat for long trips. Chip some into an empty 2-liter bottle and seal the top, and you’ve got a “dry ice popper”. I recommend putting about an inch and a half of dry ice into the bottom, and pouring a little warm water in just before sealing it.

The bottle will expand and finally explode after a few minutes. It is about as loud as a shotgun and pieces of plastic will land up to 40 feet away, so if you’re going to be filming up close you’ll want to do so from behind a sheet of lexan and wear ear protection.

If you leave the label on the bottle, the top will extend by about an inch before exploding. If the label is removed, the bottle will instead bloat and round out. Sometimes the pressure is not sufficient, and I like to use an air rifle or slingshot to trigger the explosion.

When recovered, the plastic is found to be contorted into some very interesting shapes. I found one bottle (whose bottom had blown off) where the walls had inverted up over thetop, and then recurved back down again: /\/-\/\. Email me if you want to see pictures and video of some of these.

 

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